Sharan 2010-2015

Volkswagen’s full-size people carrier, the Sharan, first went on sale in 1995.  Fifteen years later and after more than 600,000 sales, an all-new Sharan has been launched, offering maximum versatility, practicality, economy and technology. 

Revealed at the Geneva Motor Show in March 2010 and on sale in the UK in November, the new Sharan is 220 mm longer than the model it replaces, 92 mm wider and 12 mm lower.  Yet despite the gains in size and functionality, the new Sharan weighs up to 30 kg less than the model it replaces.

Key features of the new model include: seven seats with a new EasyFold seating concept, side sliding doors, a range of direct injection and highly economical petrol and diesel engines as well as a high standard specification and value for money.  As with all Volkswagen models, quality, reliability and safety are also core attributes.

The design of the new Sharan follows the latest Volkswagen ‘design DNA’.  Penned by a design team led by Walter de Silva and Klaus Bischoff, it incorporates a familiar ‘face’ with distinctive horizontal lines the main feature of its frontal appearance.  It is modern and stylish without being a design which would quickly become outdated. 

Four engines are available, two petrol and two diesel.  The petrol options comprise a 1.4-litre TSI developing 150 PS while returning 39.2 mpg and emitting 167 g/km of CO2; and a 2.0-litre unit developing 200 PS linked to a standard DSG gearbox which emits 198 g/km of CO2 while returning 33.2 mpg.  The diesel range consists of two 2.0-litre common rail engines producing 140 and 170 PS.  In 2.0-litre TDI 140 PS form the Sharan has a combined fuel consumption of 50.4 mpg with 146 g/km of CO2, making it one of the most efficient vehicles in its class.  The 1.4-litre TSI and 2.0-litre TDI 140 PS manual versions will be available from launch with other engine options following at the start of 2011.

Reinforcing Volkswagen’s commitment to producing economical vehicles, all Sharans except the 200 PS variant are designated BlueMotion Technology models and feature Stop/Start and battery regeneration systems as standard. 

Safety is a primary concern to drivers of people carriers and reflecting this, the Sharan comes well-equipped.  Standard safety equipment on all models includes ABS, Electronic Stabilisation Programme (ESP) and seven airbags including a knee airbag. 

Four trim levels will be offered in the UK: S, SE, SEL and an Executive version with six seats, aimed at the business market.

For maximum convenience, sliding doors are now standard and the EasyFold seating system incorporates easy access to the rear row of seats.  What’s more, the second generation of Park Assist is also available on the Sharan.  Not only does the new system require less space to perform automatic parallel parking manoeuvres, it also allows the Sharan to be parked in spaces at 90 degrees to the kerb.

The new Sharan will be built, like the previous generations, at the Volkswagen Autoeuropa plant in Palmela, Portugal alongside the Scirocco and Eos.

Volkswagen UK will sell around 350 Sharans in 2010, a number which will rise to around 3,400 in a full year.

SUMMARY

  • All-new Sharan was revealed at the Geneva Motor Show in March ahead of European launch in summer 2010; UK launch in November
  • Second generation Sharan takes over from the original, of which over 600,000 examples were built.  The Sharan first went on sale in 1995 and was substantially revised in May 2000
  • At 4,854 mm in length, the new Sharan is 220 mm longer than the model it replaces, 92 mm wider and 12 mm lower; despite these gains the new Sharan weighs up to 30 kg less than the previous model 
  • Designed by a team led by Klaus Bischoff, Head of Design for the Volkswagen brand, the Sharan’s new look is in line with the latest Volkswagen design DNA which is now familiar on the Golf and Polo
  • Two petrol options comprise a 1.4-litre TSI petrol engine developing 150 PS while returning 39.2 mpg and emitting 167 g/km of CO2; and a 2.0-litre unit developing 200 PS linked to a standard DSG gearbox which emits 198 g/km of CO2 while returning 33.2 mpg
  • The diesel range comprises two 2.0-litre common rail engines producing 140 and 170 PS.  In 2.0-litre TDI 140 PS form the Sharan has a combined fuel consumption of 50.4 mpg with 146 g/km of CO2, making it one of the most efficient vehicles in its class.  The 170 PS model emits 155 g/km of CO2 and returns 49.5 mpg (combined)
  • A choice of six-speed manual and DSG gearboxes is available in combination with all engines, except for the 2.0-litre TSI 200 PS which is offered with DSG only
  • The 1.4-litre TSI and 2.0-litre TDI 140 PS manual versions will be available from launch with other engine options following at the start of 2011
  • All Sharans except the 200 PS variant are designated BlueMotion Technology models and feature Stop/Start and battery regeneration systems as standard
  • Access to the rear seats in the new Sharan is granted via a pair of large sliding doors that can, along with the tailgate, be specified with electric motors to operate automatically
  • All Sharans have seven seats as standard.  The centre row features three individual seats that can be moved by up to 160 mm back and forth if required and, when not in use, can be easily folded to create a flat loadspace
  • A six seat version will also be available in Executive trim, featuring six individual leather seats with armrests which is likely to appeal to business users
  • Available as an option for the first time on the Sharan is the Adaptive Chassis Control (ACC) system featuring electronically controlled dampers with three selectable stages – normal, comfort and sport
  • A new version of Park Assist makes its debut on the Sharan.  The system is now capable of guiding the vehicle into parking spaces at right angles to the direction of traffic as well as parallel spaces
  • Standard safety equipment includes ABS, Electronic Stabilisation Programme (ESP) and nine airbags including a knee airbag
  • In the UK the Sharan will be offered in S, SE, SEL and Executive trim levels

Market information
The Sharan competes in the full-size MPV class, a direct rival to cars such as the Ford Galaxy and Renault Espace.  In the UK in 2009, this market segment accounted for sales of 22,700 vehicles.  In 2011, Volkswagen plans to sell 3,400 Sharans in the UK.

Nearly 97 per cent of Sharan buyers will opt for a diesel-engined model.  The best-selling model is predicted to be the S 2.0-litre TDI 140 PS, accounting for around 40 per cent of sales.  Over half of these models will be purchased with a DSG automatic gearbox.  Just over 30 per cent of customers will opt for this engine in the higher SE specification.

Production
The Sharan is produced at Volkswagen’s Autoeuropa plant in Palmela, Portugal, alongside the Scirocco and Eos models.

Autoeuropa represents the biggest foreign industrial investment in Portugal and is one of the most modern car production units in Europe.  The plant covers a total area of 2,000,000 square metres, of which 1,100,000 sq m are dedicated to production, and the remaining 900,000 sq m to the nearby industrial park.  Over 700 suppliers provide parts to Volkswagen Autoeuropa, using the ‘just in time’ production philosophy.  The plant produces around 400 vehicles per day.

The Autoeuropa plant was founded in 1991, as a 50/50 joint venture agreement between Ford and Volkswagen.  Production then began in 1995 of the Volkswagen Sharan, Ford Galaxy and SEAT Alhambra.  In 1999, Volkswagen assumed full ownership of the plant.  By 2003, the factory had produced one million MPVs.  In 2006, the Eos convertible coupé began to be built at Autoeuropa and at the same time, the production of the Ford Galaxy there ceased.

DESIGN

The new Sharan is a completely redesigned vehicle – in fact the only parts carried across from old to new were the sun visors.  This fundamental change is also reflected in the altered dimensions.  At 4.85 m, the new Sharan is now 22 cm longer.  At the same time, its width has increased by 9.4 cm to 1.9 m, yet height has fallen to 1.72 m giving a lower, wider stance and more powerful overall appearance.  

For the first time, the Sharan is also equipped with rear sliding doors and these can be specified with electric operation.  In construction, the Sharan sets a new benchmark in the segment for the static and dynamic torsional rigidity of its body.  Yet, despite this, weight has been reduced by up to 30 kg.   

Exterior
Responsible for the visual styling of the new Sharan are Walter de Silva (Head of Design for the Volkswagen Group) and Klaus Bischoff (Head of Design for the Volkswagen Brand).  They designed the MPV based on the new Volkswagen ‘design-DNA’ matrix.  As a result, the vehicle’s styling is epitomised by clear, horizontal lines, and encompasses a fresh look – but which is not a passing fashion.  The aim of the design is rather to create − with its balanced proportions and minimal lines − an ideal form for giving the body a dynamic and classic appearance.

Front styling
At the front, the dual headlights incorporated into the V-contour of the bonnet can be ordered in a standard H7 or bi-xenon version.  The H7 headlights are subdivided by a so-called masking plate into a larger area with dipped and main beam lights and a narrow lower section with daytime running and indicator lights.  The chrome-plated masking plates guide the horizontal lines of the front end into the headlights and give the Sharan a more concise overall appearance.

New H7 long-life halogen discharge lamps are used for the dipped lights, significantly increasing their service life.  The parking and daytime running lights − generally subjected to many hours of use − also use long-life or super long-life technology.  The reflector size of the dipped light and its optimal mounting height in the Sharan guarantee very good and widely distributed illumination of the carriageway.

If the Sharan is ordered with optional bi-xenon headlights, a newly designed LED daytime running and position light is included within the headlamp module.  It is made up of 15 individual LEDs arranged in a concise ‘light signature’ within the module.  The bi-xenon headlights are also equipped with dynamic cornering lights and a motorway function that automatically activates the lights at speeds above around 70 mph.  The xenon burners used here are Type D3S mercury-free lighting sources, which Volkswagen has implemented on all xenon headlights of its new models well ahead of their legally required introduction in 2012.

Rear styling
The Sharan’s rear look is just as clearly structured as that of the front.  The dominant visual elements here are the concise roof-edge spoiler, the deep tailgate (sill height: 0.67 m) and large rear lights which reflect the styling of the headlamps.  As on the previous model, the rear lights are designed as two-part units, but are much larger.  They extend from the D-pillar well into the tailgate and create an unmistakable night look in the form of a stylised “M”.  To reduce workshop time and enhance convenience, bulbs can easily be replaced by opening a small cap on the inside trim panel, where it is easy to loosen the central mounting screw for the lamp with a tool from the on-board toolkit.  On the right side of the vehicle, this cap is designed as a control panel with a 12V socket that can be pushed downwards together with the plug to gain access to the central mounting screw.

As an option, the Sharan’s boot can be specified with an electric opening and closing function.  In this case, opening and closing are controlled by a button in the tailgate handle, a switch on the centre console or a button on the remote control key.  Like the electrically-controlled side sliding doors, the electric tailgate is also equipped with pinch protection.  One advantage of the electric-powered option is that it makes opening and closing of the tailgate much easier for smaller adults (height from ground is 1.89 m).

Side profile
One of the Sharan’s distinctive features is its smooth side profile.  The designers also gave a unique feel to the side windows which sit relatively low on the vehicle, conveying a sense of transparency and airiness.  The bottom edge of the side windows rises dynamically at the front and rear, giving the roof’s A- and D-pillars a character of their own.  Designers refer to this as a ‘reverse angle’ – a design element that is also cited at the front and rear of the Sharan and matches that of other Volkswagen models.  The Sharan’s roof rails are integrated neatly into the side profile.

Side sliding doors
All new Sharans are equipped with two rear sliding doors which have been designed to open and close extremely smoothly.  As an option, they can be made to slide with an electric motor.  Here, the doors are electrically controlled by pressing one of the two buttons (one for the left door and one for the right) on the centre console in front of the gear shift grip, a button in each of the B-pillars or by grasping the door handles themselves.  The electric sliding doors may also be opened or closed via the remote control key.  To prevent accidental damage, if the fuel filler cap is open, the sliding door on the right cannot be opened from inside the vehicle in either the electric or manual version.  Both door versions include electric windows and fully retractable side windows.

To enhance practicality, the door handles are located to the left and right of the B-pillar, allowing either the driver or passenger to open the front or rear door with a single hand movement and without changing position.  Anyone with small children will appreciate this feature!  The fact that the sliding doors open to the rear also creates an extremely large aperture, offering easy access to the rear seating space.

The sliding doors each glide on three rails that run in the door sill area, in the side panel above the rear wheel housing and in the roof frame.  The rail in the roof frame is housed in a separate box that protects the rail from the elements.  The entirely free-standing B-pillars, which are visible when the front door and sliding door are opened, highlight the Sharan’s exceptional construction quality.

An important safety feature of the electric sliding doors is that opening and closing can be stopped at any time; this also means that the opening width can be modified.  A self-locking drive system is used, so the door is securely held in place even on a hill.  In addition, the electric sliding doors not only have a powerful drive but a power closing assist function integrated in the latch mechanism which securely closes the sliding doors even if the seals are iced.  It is necessary to monitor the forces applied here, which is why the doors are equipped with an efficient pinch control system.

The Sharan is one of the few vehicles of this type to have two protective systems working in parallel.  The first is located at the front edge of the sliding doors where a pinch protection strip in the seal reacts to any detected pressure.  The second protective system is implemented by an algorithm in the controller, which continually compares the ratio of the drive’s electrical current draw with the door’s drive speed to detect an obstacle.  If one of the doors encounters an object while closing, it automatically stops and reverses.  If an obstacle is detected while opening, it stops immediately.  In addition, a warning signal sounds whenever the doors are being closed.

Aerodynamics
The new Sharan is one of the world’s most fuel-efficient MPVs and this is thanks not only to efficient engines but also aerodynamics.  Its Cw value is 0.299 – a five per cent improvement over the previous model.  The aerodynamic properties of the new Sharan were studied and perfected in an early stage of development using computational flow analysis.  The results fed directly into the design of the first models, while in the next stage, aerodynamic specialists and designers refined the details further. 

The A-pillars, for example, incorporate an optimised water-trapping profile which diverts the air flow from the windscreen to the side windows with low losses – this detail contributes as much to low air drag as it does to low wind noises and good visibility of the outside mirrors when driving in the rain.  In parallel, the aerodynamics of the mirrors and their mounts were fine-tuned, resulting in a design which offers very little resistance to the wind, produces little wind noise and maintains the cleanliness of the mirrors.  They also reduce water flow over the side windows when driving in rain, which improves visibility and safety.

Aerodynamic parameters even influenced the design of the side skirts: they optimise air flow over the rear wheels, minimising drag.  The spoiler and underbody panels are also designed to direct the flow of air under the Sharan with low losses, reducing drag and improving the cooling of the powertrain and brakes.  In the rear, a roof spoiler reduces air turbulence.

Construction
In designing the new Sharan, Volkswagen’s engineers set out to create a safe, refined and strong vehicle.  This would normally mean the weight of the body structure increasing to 438 kg to attain the new car’s significantly improved crash properties and heightened rigidity requirements, as well as to increase the vehicle’s length and integrate two sliding doors.

But the body structure’s weight was actually decreased by more than 10 per cent to 389 kg thanks to the use of innovative materials and production methods.  The largest share of weight reduction can be attributed to hot-formed steels, which are used generously in the underbody structure, the B-pillars and the roof frame.  Just by integrating roof frame components hot-formed as tailored blanks, weight was reduced by 1.4 kg.

The excellent properties of hot-formed components are obtained in a manufacturing process in which the plate is heated to a glowing red, formed in one draw, and then cooled in the transformation tool in a defined process.  These components are used in areas subject to extremely high crash stresses, so that the survival space of the occupant cage is protected even in severe collisions.  Thirteen per cent of the weight of the body-in-white is taken up by this material, achieving a weight saving of about 26 kg.

Another important weight-saving measure was reducing the material thickness of less stressed parts, such as outer skin parts, without compromising their functional properties or high-quality appearance; an additional 11 kg was cut here.

What’s more, the Sharan’s exceptionally rigid body meets the highest standards for acoustic and vibration behaviour.  This is attributable to an innovative layout of nodes and force absorption points.  The available space is exploited by a body structure that is built up in three shells; the overall occupant cell is enclosed in computer-optimised profiles.  This improved the vehicle’s lightweight construction factor − a measure of efficient weight utilisation − by 40 per cent compared to the previous model, despite clearly elevated crash requirements and larger vehicle dimensions.

Given this reduction in weight, it is all the more remarkable that the Sharan’s static torsional rigidity of 22,400 Nm/° is class-leading.  The same is true of the dynamic rigidity of the body structure.  The Sharan’s static rigidity was increased by 63 per cent compared to the previous model.  All these improvements benefit noise reduction, refinement, driving comfort and safety.  More details on performance and crash-optimised construction can be found in the Safety section of this press pack.

Interior design – seating
The new Sharan is both practical and highly versatile.  In the UK, customers can choose between a standard seven-seat version and a six-seater which is available in Executive trim with leather upholstery and aimed at the business market.

Thanks to the new EasyFold seat concept, the individual seats of the second and third seating rows no longer need to be removed from the vehicle when not needed; they can simply be stowed in the vehicle floor with an easy-to-use folding mechanism.  Like the front seats, the second row rear seats also adjust longitudinally and over backrest angles of up to 20 degrees.  

Front row
One of the best features of the previous Sharan was the upright, comfortable sitting position of driver and front seat passenger, and engineers have taken this further for the new generation.  The seat position was made sportier with a slightly lower seat height (321 mm), so that − in conjunction with the clear cockpit layout, the slightly more tilted steering wheel (28 degrees) and positions of the centre armrest and gear shift − a comfortable sitting and driving position can be attained.  For the first time, a 12-way electrically adjustable seat, including driver’s side memory function, is now available as an option on the Sharan. 

Despite the new Sharan’s lower overall height, headroom has been increased: driver and passenger each now have 1,077 mm, which is 16 mm more than before.

Middle row
The design of the second row of seats has also been completely revised.  The individual seats here can be adjusted 160 mm fore and aft, and they now provide much more legroom thanks to changes such as a 58 mm increase in seat height to 373 mm.  Headroom, meanwhile, was increased by 14 mm to 973 mm.  An important point for families is that the two outer seats can be ordered with integrated child seats which offer younger passengers (aged three and above) optimal safety and comfort.  A simple mechanism is used to adjust the vertical height of the seating surface for children, while special lateral seat supports hold them snugly in place.  When the Sharan is ordered with a child seat, that seating position is automatically equipped with a belt tensioner.  The seats in the second and third rows are all equipped with Isofix brackets to mount detachable child seats.  The sliding doors may also be ordered with sun shades to protect small children in the second seating row from sunlight.

It is very easy to stow the seats in the second row to create a level cargo floor: activating the seat backrest handle folds the backrest onto the seat surface, while the seat is simultaneously lowered into the foot room floor in a forward direction by the so-called ‘Dive-Down’ kinematics.  As safe as they are practical are the redesigned rear head restraints which can be raised to offer optimal protection for tall people; or, when not in use, lowered to be nearly flush with the tops of the seat backs.  Crucially, this means that they do not need to be removed before folding the seats completely forward.

Third row
Getting into the third row of seats has been made much easier thanks not only to wide-opening sliding doors but also an Easy Entry function which enables the outer seats on the second row to be pushed forward and tilted.  

While the two rear seats in MPVs are generally reserved for children, the 75 mm longer wheelbase of the new Sharan (at 2.92 m) means that adults can ride comfortably in these seats over moderate distances.  Maximum headroom in the third row is 945 mm.

Bootspace
No matter which of the seats in the back are folded down, what is always produced is a totally level surface for loading luggage.  Even if just the third row of seats is folded down with the easy-to-use, single hand mechanism, this frees up a space 1.3 m deep.  Loaded to the top edge of the seat backrests, luggage capacity of the seven-seat Sharan is 711 litres.  Thanks to an easily fitted mesh partition, the Sharan can be loaded up to the roof without any safety concerns.  In this case, the luggage capacity increases to 1,167 litres.

If the seats in the second row are stowed, this produces a continuous luggage space, which – measured to the backrests of the front seats – is 2.1 m long.  With the luggage area extended to this maximum length, the seven-seater’s cargo capacity, loaded to the roof, is up to 2,297 litres.  A new cargo management system, located behind the second and third seating rows, securely holds luggage in place.  The system consists of two movable telescopic rails anchored in the sidewalls that are extremely easy to unlock and lock by turning, and a net stretched between them.  In addition, the system provides further lashing points for securing items such as bags on the side walls.

Storage
Whether it is used for family or for business, the new Sharan is a practical MPV and nowhere is this more obvious than in its array of storage compartments.  These are located in the doors, the roof liner, under the front seats and in front of the second row seats as well as in the luggage space.  When the new cargo management system is included, the Sharan has up to 33 different storage options.  Typical of this is the large storage bin on the dashboard which has a volume of 3.2 litres.  The standard, extendable centre armrest between the front seats also houses a storage compartment.  Bottles of up to 1.5-litres in size can be stowed in the front doors, while the sliding doors can handle bottles with a capacity of 1.0-litre.  Two can or cup holders in the front and in the second seating row are also ideally placed.

Controls
The basic layout of the Sharan’s dashboard has been completely redesigned.  Although key instruments, such as switches for the lights and the climate control system, are still in almost identical positions, they are now much easier to see and operate.  Like the exterior, the interior dashboard features a strictly horizontal layout, with a distinctive trim running between its upper and lower sections from the driver’s side to the passenger’s side.  All materials used in the new Sharan’s cabin are of a high quality, with soft surfaces made using so-called ‘slush technology’ and extensive use of metal accents on air vents and switch surrounds.

The centre console has been consciously ‘pulled out’ a considerable distance towards the gearshift lever as well as raised up, so that it lies within an ideal operating radius for the driver and passenger.  It houses the various audio, video and navigation systems, plus – arranged below these – controls for the climate control system.  A touchscreen display is added for the navigation systems and premium audio system when specified. 

Located below the display, and ideally positioned so that it is easy to reach, is the switch for the hazard warning lights.  Above it is a large storage compartment.  The lower-most level of the centre console contains another row of switches for functions such as opening and closing the optional electrically operated sliding doors, the ACC Adaptive Chassis Control system and Park Assist.  If the Sharan has been ordered with the ‘Keyless Access’ automatic locking and starting system, the engine start button is located directly in front of the gear lever on the centre console.

Located in its customary position between the seats is the handbrake; however, it is no longer a lever, rather – since the handbrake is now electronically activated across the model range – it is simply a switch.  Just behind it is the switch for activating the auto hold function, which is new to the Sharan and prevents unintentional vehicle rolling, for example at traffic lights.

The speedometer and rev counter, the two central round instruments, are easy to read and rimmed in silver.  When the lights are on they are backlit in white.  The Sharan’s multifunction display is arranged between the round instruments

Climate control
All Sharans come as standard with a 3Zone electronic climate control system which allows driver and front-seat passenger to adjust their own climates individually and independently as well as heating and ventilation for rear passengers

As an alternative, Sharan customers can upgrade the 3Zone system to have additional rear controls.  Here, three zones – driver, front passenger and rear seats – can specify individual temperatures and control air blower speeds.  In the second seating row, there is a separate control unit (at the rear of the centre console), while nozzles on the dashboard and in the roof area of the second and third seating rows deliver the air to individual seats. 

To make this system function effectively, these vehicles have an externally controlled compressor, while total system power was also significantly improved.  Load-based control of the compressor as a function of power demand also has a positive effect on system efficiency.  Developed using the latest flow simulation methods, the air distribution system and air conditioning units were designed to reduce electrical drive power while improving climate comfort in the passenger compartment.  In part, this has been achieved by uniform air distribution at low air flow speed.  Individual air flow paths were also optimised to reduce flow resistance, while at the same time, thermal energy losses through air duct walls were minimised.  As a result, the Sharan’s new climate control systems make a contribution towards lower fuel consumption and emissions.

Also helping enhance economy and reduce emissions is a new approach to defogging in the Sharan.  Where previous systems have run the air conditioning compressor constantly in order to dehumidify the interior and hence reduce misting up, the new Sharan detects the likelihood of fogging by comparing the air and windscreen temperatures, and only engaging the compressor when necessary.  The related sensor – a multi-purpose device that detects rain, light and humidity – is located at the base of the rear-view mirror.

ENGINES

The Sharan is available with a choice of four engines: two petrol units – a 1.4-litre TSI 150 PS and a 2.0-litre TSI 200 PS; plus two 2.0-litre diesels offering 140 or 170 PS.  All are available with a choice of six-speed manual or DSG automatic gearboxes, except the 200 PS petrol unit which is only offered with a DSG transmission.

All except the 200 PS petrol engine are also badged BlueMotion Technology and incorporate Stop/Start and battery regeneration systems in order to reduce fuel consumption and emissions.

Stop/Start
The Sharan’s automatic Stop/Start system is operated through the clutch pedal.  When coming to a halt at traffic lights, for example, the driver depresses the clutch and selects neutral.  When the clutch is released, the engine shuts down and a ‘Start / Stop’ symbol illuminates on the multifunction display.  In order to move away, the driver simply depresses the clutch once again to select first gear and the engine restarts automatically.  On DSG variants, the engine shuts down and restarts in response to the brake pedal.  The system can be deactivated through a switch, if necessary.

Battery regeneration
A battery regeneration system helps to utilise energy that would otherwise be lost during braking.  In deceleration and braking phases, the alternator’s voltage is boosted and used for bulk recharging of the car’s battery.  Thanks to alternator control, it is possible to lower alternator voltage, for example during deceleration or driving at a constant speed.  It is even possible to switch off the alternator entirely which reduces engine load and improves fuel consumption.

Petrol engines

TSI technology
In June 2006, Volkswagen launched the latest in a line of innovations with the introduction of TSI petrol technology.  Previous engines have used FSI technology, whereby petrol is injected directly into the combustion chamber to improve efficiency and hence reduce fuel consumption and emissions.  Taking this further, TSI can use – for the first time ever in a production car – an FSI engine which is then dual-charged through a combination of an engine driven supercharger and an exhaust gas turbocharger arranged in series.  Alternatively, lower powered TSI units use simply a sophisticated turbocharger.

The driving characteristics of TSI engines are improved over those of a conventional FSI unit.  With twincharged versions, the belt-driven supercharger on the higher-powered derivatives operates at the lower engine speeds, with the turbocharger coming in as engine speed increases.  The result of this is excellent driveability and performance throughout the range with no turbo lag and high maximum torque.

Key to the TSI’s success is that direct injection allows an abnormally high compression ratio of 10:1 to be used in conjunction with high maximum boost pressure of up to 2.5 bar absolute.  This enables the relatively small engine to use very high gearing to provide exceptional fuel efficiency for a petrol engine, particularly at motorway cruising speeds.  As an additional bonus, the TSI engine provides driver enjoyment, producing high power and torque across a rev range from 1,000 to 6,500 rpm.

TSI technology has received international acclaim, with, among other awards, the 1.4-litre TSI claiming the title of International Engine of the Year for the past two years.

1.4-litre TSI, 1390 cc, 16-valve 4-cyl, 150 PS
This engine produces 150 PS at 5,800 rpm and 240 Nm (177 lbs ft) of torque from 2,000, offering flexible and impressive performance.  It has a zero to 62 mph time of 10.7 seconds and a top speed of 122 mph.  Combined economy is 39.2 mpg with the standard six-speed manual gearbox and CO2 emissions are 167 g/km.

2.0-litre TSI, 1968 cc, 16-valve 4-cyl, 200 PS
The range-topping engine in the Sharan line-up, this unit produces 200 PS at 6,000 rpm and 280 Nm (207 lbs ft) from 1,800 rpm.  Although it is designated a ‘TSI’ engine, it is boosted simply by a turbocharger and intercooler, and is not twincharged.  This engine, offered with a six-speed DSG gearbox, returns 33.2 mpg on the combined cycle and carbon dioxide emissions of 198 g/km.

Diesel engines
All new Sharans use Volkswagen’s common rail diesel technology, ensuring they are frugal, clean and quiet in operation.  Naturally they all comply with Euro5 emissions standards.  

For the first time on a Volkswagen passenger car, the Sharan uses an SCR (selective catalytic reduction) catalytic converter together with an additive, the synthetically-produced, water-based urea solution containing 32.5 per cent urea, AdBlue.  Together, SCR and AdBlue lead to a significant reduction in nitrogen oxide emissions.  ‘Selective’ refers to the way the catalytic converter selectively converts nitrogen oxide (NOx) components in the exhaust system into nitrogen and water without producing undesirable by-products. 

Stored in an auxiliary 17 litre tank housed in the left wheelhousing, the AdBlue solution is continuously sprayed into the exhaust gas, upstream of the SCR catalytic converter.  The rate of spray is metered via engine management according to the mass flow rate of the exhaust gas using a NOx sensor downstream of the SCR catalytic converter.  Atomised into a fine vapour through a screen, the urea in the AdBlue is converted in the hot exhaust gas upstream of the catalytic converter, reacting with the nitrogen oxides and splitting them into nitrogen and water.

AdBlue is water-based, non-toxic, odour-free and biodegradable, and on average, 0.1 litres of AdBlue are used per 100 km (62 miles).  AdBlue is refilled as part of the standard servicing regime.

All Sharan TDIs also feature an oxidation catalytic converter and diesel particulate filter (DPF) to reduce other potentially harmful emissions.  The DPF is self-regenerating and requires no routine maintenance.

2.0-litre TDI common rail engine
Fuel injection for the Sharan’s two 1,968 cc diesel engines is handled by the latest generation common rail system, with up to 1,800 bar injection pressure and special injection nozzles delivering especially fine atomisation of the fuel.  Control of the eight-hole injection nozzles is achieved by the latest generation of piezo in-line injectors.  Electrically-controlled piezo crystals, assisted by a hydraulic element, inject the right amount of fuel in just fractions of a second.  Compared with conventional solenoid valves, piezo technology enables more flexible injection processes with smaller and more precisely metered fuel volumes.  This leads to a very quiet and smooth running engine and exceptionally quick throttle response with low fuel consumption and emissions.

2.0-litre TDI, 1968 cc, 16-valve 4-cyl, 140 PS
The predicted best-seller – the 2.0-litre TDI 140 PS – produces 140 PS at 4,200 rpm and 320 Nm (236 lbs ft) of torque from 1,750 rpm; it is available with a six-speed manual or DSG gearbox.  It has a zero to 62 mph time of 10.9 seconds and a top speed of 121 mph (119 DSG).  Despite its strong performance credentials, fuel consumption remains impressive with a combined figure of 50.4 mpg (49.6 DSG) and CO2 emissions of 146 g/km (149 DSG). 

2.0-litre TDI, 1968 cc, 16-valve 4-cyl, 170 PS
The most powerful diesel Sharan produces 170 PS at 4,200 rpm and maximum torque of 350 Nm (258 lbs ft) from 1,750 to 2,500 rpm.  This car accelerates from zero to 62 mph in 9.5 seconds and goes on to a top speed of 130 mph.  Available with a six-speed manual or DSG gearbox, this engine returns a combined fuel economy figure of 48.7 mpg (47.9 DSG) and carbon dioxide emissions of 153 g/km (154 DSG).

Gearboxes

Six-speed manual
All Sharans (except the 2.0-litre TSI 200 PS) come as standard with a six-speed manual gearbox.  A wider spread of ratios than is possible with a five-speed transmission not only benefits fuel consumption, but also makes the Sharan more responsive.  These gearboxes are filled with lifetime oil and need no routine maintenance.

This transmission has a magnesium shift housing, is cable-operated and has short lever movements, with three-cone synchromesh for the lower gears ensuring a pleasant shift action.  Reduced-friction bearings further increase the gearbox’s efficiency and cut fuel consumption.

DSG – Direct Shift Gearbox
Available as an option with all engines and standard on the 2.0-litre TSI 200 PS is a six-speed Direct Shift Gearbox (DSG).  DSG is a true innovation, combining the comfort of an automatic gearbox with the agility and economy of a manual unit. 

The six-speed, transversely mounted DSG has two wet clutches (offering a higher thermal load tolerance than dry clutches) with hydraulic pressure regulation.  One clutch controls the ‘odd’ gears plus reverse, while the other operates the ‘even’ gears.  Essentially it is two gearboxes in one.

With this new clutch management system, the breaks in power that are typical of even an automatic-shift manual gearbox no longer occur.  This is achieved by an intelligent hydraulic and electronic (mechatronic) gearbox control system, the two wet-type clutches and the two input and output shafts in each half of the gearbox.

This combination enables the next-higher gear ratio to remain engaged but on standby until it is actually selected.  In other words, if the car is being driven in third gear, fourth is selected but not yet activated.  As soon as the ideal shift point is reached, the clutch on the third-gear side opens, the other clutch closes and fourth gear engages under accurate electronic supervision.  Since the opening and closing actions of the two clutches overlap, a smooth gearshift results and the entire shift process is completed in less than four-hundredths of a second.

Servicing
Volkswagen offers customers a choice of servicing regime for their Sharan.  They can choose Time and Distance or LongLife Servicing and the appropriate selection is entirely dependent on how the car is likely to be driven and its use. 

Time and Distance Servicing is recommended for vehicles that will cover less than 10,000 miles in 12 months and if the vehicle is likely to be used in:

  • Predominantly city centre driving, short journeys with frequent cold starts
  • Activities regularly producing high engine loading, for example frequent hill climbs, driving with vehicle fully loaded and towing
  • Driving with high rpm, hard acceleration and heavy braking

In this case, the vehicle will be serviced at regular intervals, at every 10,000 miles or every 12 months. 

LongLife Servicing is recommended for vehicles with a daily mileage of more than 25 miles, where the vehicle is driven regularly and on mainly longer distance journeys.  The vehicle should be mainly driven at a constant speed with minimum vehicle and engine loading, minimal towing and driven in an economical manner.  In this case, the on-board computer informs the driver via a dashboard display, when the vehicle needs a service.  A range of engine sensors electronically monitors the vehicle’s oil temperature, oil pressure, oil level and brake pad wear to establish when a service is needed. 

With the LongLife system, the vehicle can cover typically between 10,000 and 18,000 miles (approx) or 24 months (whichever is sooner) between oil changes.  An inspection service is typically due in the third year of ownership or at 40,000 miles and thereafter every second year for vehicles with an annual mileage of around 10,000 miles.

Customers can choose between Time and Distance or LongLife Servicing at PDI (pre-delivery inspection) and though it is possible to change from one to another during the vehicle’s life, it can only be done when a full inspection service is due.

RUNNING GEAR

In designing the Sharan’s chassis, engineers set out to find the ideal balance between driving dynamics and driving comfort. To achieve this aim, they made use of Volkswagen’s modular system, employing components from both the Tiguan and Passat’s chassis, and redefining them for the MPV. 

The result is a front strut-type suspension system and a four-link axle at the rear, permitting the greatest combination of comfort and stability to be achieved.  To guarantee the required payloads, certain axle components such as the subframe and suspension links of the rear axle were reinforced. 

The subframe of the rear axle was also broadened (track width increased by 50 mm compared to Passat) in order to allow the appropriate amount of room to accommodate the third row of seats.  In addition, the subframe has new rubber mountings to enhance comfort and reduce noise levels.

Adaptive Chassis Control – ACC
For the first time, the Sharan is available with Volkswagen’s Adaptive Chassis Control system, ACC. 

Engineers have in the past been constrained to design a suspension system which is biased either towards comfort or sportiness, always resulting in some form of compromise.  The ideal, it was decided, would be to produce a chassis that could continually adapt to road conditions and the particular wishes of the driver or passengers.  This has been achieved by employing an Adaptive Chassis Control (ACC) system.  Here not only can the suspension’s damping characteristics be controlled at the touch of a button, but the electro-mechanical power steering and accelerator response are also modified at the same time.

ACC functions via a set of four electrically adjustable dampers operated through pneumatic valves.  Each damper is fitted with characteristic map control, a gateway control module that serves as an interface with the CAN data networks in the Sharan – these comprise three sensors for measuring wheel displacement, three sensors for measuring movements of the body structure and a control module for the damping.

These sensors constantly (up to 1,000 times per second) measure the vehicle’s behaviour – be it under braking, acceleration or cornering – and react almost instantaneously to ensure the optimum mix of chassis agility and comfort at all times.  The vehicle defaults to ‘Normal’ mode in which the system strikes a balance for general use.  Should the driver select ‘Sport’ mode the steering assistance is reduced, the damping is hardened and the throttle responses are sharpened as the mapping changes.  This is intended for either twisty roads or track driving.  In ‘Comfort’ the damping is softened and the steering assistance is increased to provide a smooth and controlled ride best suited to motorway driving.

Electro-mechanical power steering
For the first time, the Sharan now benefits from electro-mechanical power steering.  Unlike some similar steering systems, the Sharan’s is able to vary the steering feel to suit the speed and driving situation: firm and direct when driving hard, effortless at parking speeds.  Other advantages of the system include its mild self-centring action, its ability to compensate for different driving hazards such as crosswinds and steep road cambers, and a beneficial effect on fuel economy.

Braking system
Standard equipment on all Sharans is Volkswagen’s Electronic Stabilisation Programme with counter steering support, which includes an anti-lock braking system (ABS), electronic differential lock (EDL), traction control (ASR) and Hydraulic Brake Assist (HBA).

Electronic Stabilisation Programme (ESP) with counter-steering support and trailer stabilisation
Essentially, ESP is a sophisticated system that automatically senses any tendency for the car to slide.  Should this situation occur, ESP reacts by applying the brakes to one, two, three or all four wheels and adjusts the engine’s power.  In this way, it is possible that a skid is corrected even before the driver is aware that one has started. 

This can be useful if a tendency to understeer or oversteer develops in a bend.  In such circumstances ESP can help prevent the car skidding or spinning off the road and is particularly helpful in wet or icy conditions. 

The latest generation of ESP fitted to the new Sharan has a finer response, counter-steering recommendation and offers trailer stabilisation. 

This function can be activated by a Volkswagen Retailer when a Volkswagen-approved towbar is fitted.  This system extends the capability of the normal ESP purely through a software extension.  It does not require additional sensors. 

When the onset of yawing of a trailer is detected by the ESP control module the system automatically reduces or cuts engine power and applies the brakes to appropriate wheels dynamically in phase with the yawing to oppose the snaking motion and stabilise the vehicle/trailer combination.  When stability is achieved the brakes and engine power return to normal control.  During the automatic braking process the brake lights are turned on even though the driver may not be touching the brake pedal.

Hydraulic Brake Assist – HBA
Working in conjunction with the other elements of the braking system, this latest form of HBA recognises from the speed at which the brake pedal is depressed whether it is a ‘normal’ braking situation or an emergency stop.  In the event of an emergency stop, HBA increases braking pressure, activating ABS and ensuring the level of braking meets the needs of the conditions.  The application of brake assist makes it possible even for unskilled drivers to reduce braking distances by around 25 per cent.   

Electronic Parking Brake with auto hold function
All new Sharans have an electronic parking brake with standard auto hold function.  A separate control unit, which is linked with the ESP control unit and therefore a part of the Controller Area Network (CAN), is needed to actuate and monitor the electro-mechanical parking brake.  This is important, because it means that all the convenience and safety functions of the electro-mechanical parking brake can be perfectly controlled, offering noticeable advantages over a conventional handbrake. 

The auto hold function is activated by a button near the gear lever and is useful when the car is regularly stopping for short periods, for example when driving in heavy traffic.  In this case, the parking brake is applied automatically whenever the vehicle is brought to rest on the footbrake, preventing it from rolling forwards or backwards.  The brake is then released as soon as the accelerator is pressed.

EQUIPMENT AND TRIM

The Sharan is offered in three different trim levels: S, SE, SEL and Executive.  Key items of specification for each trim level are shown below, while comprehensive details can be found in the price list at www.vwpress.co.uk.

S 1.4-litre TSI 150 PS
S 2.0-litre TDI 140 PS

  • ABSanti-lock brakes with HBA (Hydraulic Brake Assist)
  • ESP(Electronic Stabilisation Programme), including ASR (traction control) and EDL (Electronic Differential Lock)
  • alarm with interior monitoring
  • parking brake with auto hold
  • electric child locks for rear doors
  • electric windows front and rear
  • driver and front passenger airbags; driver’s knee airbag
  • side airbag along all three rows of seats
  • driver’s seat height adjustment; front centre armrest
  • 3Zone electronic climate control
  • RCD 310 radio/CD player with eight speakers
  • MDI (Multi-Device Interface) with iPod connectivity
  • DABdigital radio receiver
  • tyre pressure monitor
  • tonneau cover
  • 6½J x 16 steel wheels with 205/60 R16 self-sealing tyres

SE 1.4-litre TSI 150 PS
SE 2.0-litre TDI 140 PS
SE 2.0-litre TDI 170 PS 

Different from or in addition to S models, SE models feature:

  • multifunction steering wheel
  • cruise control
  • automatic dimming rear-view mirror with rain sensor
  • coming and leaving home lighting function
  • under-seat drawers for driver and front passenger
  • height adjustment for both front seats (manual) with electric back rest adjustment
  • load through function for front passenger seat
  • parking sensors, front and rear
  • mobile rubbish container
  • Bluetooth preparation for Hands Free Profile enabled telephones
  • chrome trim
  • 6½J x 16 ‘Memphis’ alloy wheels with 215/60 R16 self-sealing (run flat) tyres and anti-theft bolts

SEL 2.0-litre TSI 200 PS DSG
SEL 2.0-litre TDI 140 PS
SEL 2.0-litre TDI 170 PS

At the top of the range, SEL models gain:

  • sport comfort seats with Alcantara upholstery, heated front seats
  • 65 per cent tinted rear glass
  • heated windscreen washer jets
  • brushed aluminium decorative inserts
  • RCD 510 radio/CD autochanger with eight speakers
  • entry warning lights in front doors
  • front fog lights with turning light
  • panoramic sunroof
  • chrome roof rails
  • 7J x 17 ‘Sydney’ alloy wheels with 225/50 R17 self-sealing (run flat) tyres and anti-theft bolts

Executive 2.0-litre TDI 140 PS
Aimed at the high-end business market, the Executive has all the features of the SEL but has six seats with individual armrests and full ‘Vienna’ leather upholstery.

FACTORY-FIT OPTIONS

A number of factory- and retailer-fit options are available for the Sharan, allowing buyers further to customise their vehicles.  These include alloy wheel upgrades, Adaptive Chassis Control, a cargo management system, keyless entry, Park Assist, satellite navigation and audio upgrades.  For full details of availability and prices please see the latest price list.

Park Assist
Park Assist is an automated steering assistance system for parallel parking and reverse parking into spaces at 90 degrees to the road.  Using a series of sensors mounted on the front, rear and side of the Sharan, the system plots the ideal manoeuvring path into a parallel space measuring less than one metre more than the Sharan, either to the right or left of the vehicle. 

When driving at speeds of under around 18 mph and within an appropriate parking environment, an ultrasonic sensor system detects spaces.  A control unit then notifies the driver an appropriate space has been found and calculates the ideal parking path.  Once in the recommended ‘start’ position, the driver engages reverse gear.  During the parking process the driver has no steering input – he or she simply accelerates and brakes as appropriate.  Once reverse gear is engaged, the whole operation generally takes no more than 15 seconds. 

This system also incorporates audible parking sensors with volume reduction when activated and optical parking display via the vehicle’s audio system. 

In addition, it can also be specified to include a rear-view camera which transmits a real-time, distortion-free image of what is behind the car to the screen in the central display.  This allows the driver to see and recognise obstacles behind the car, and manoeuvre into the tightest parking spaces.  While moving, the screen marks out the car’s steering movements with coloured orientation lines.  This facility can also be extremely useful when hooking up to a tow hitch. 

Parking sensors
Optional on S models and standard on all others, is a parking distance control system.  This uses four ultrasonic sensors, integrated in the rear bumper, to pinpoint parked vehicles or other objects behind the car.  Automatically activated when reverse gear is selected, the system produces an audible warning signal to guide the driver up to a safe distance to any objects behind.  It also incorporates an optical parking display via the vehicle’s audio system. 

RNS 315 touchscreen satellite navigation/radio system
All Sharans can be specified with Volkswagen’s new RNS 315 satellite navigation system.  The installation uses a five-inch touchscreen for fast, intuitive operation of the entertainment and navigation menus and displaying of information.  Key features include a CD drive for navigation disc or audio CDs, playback with title display for MP3 files and an integrated SD memory card reader from which files can be retrieved.

The navigation function offers a moving map in the colour display panel, integrated direction symbols as well as spoken instructions. 

For the navigation to function, rear ABS wheel sensors are used to determine the distance the car has covered and to provide information when the car is turning.  Further system components include a solid state magnetic compass concealed under the roof and a three-way roof aerial for radio and GPS (Global Positioning System).  The aerial receives signals from the satellites in orbit from which the system is able to calculate the position of the car on the surface of the earth.

RNS 510 DVD touchscreen satellite navigation/radio system
Also available on all Sharans is the RNS 510 satellite navigation system.  This features a six and a half inch colour screen plus integrated voice control system which responds to spoken voice commands for navigation, CD and radio functions.

As well as playing CDs in the usual manner, favourite tracks can also be stored onto the internal, 30 GB hard-drive via an SD card slot in the front of the unit.  The hard-drive can also be used to store navigation mapping.  In addition routes can be recorded while driving and then re-traced by following guidance provided by the stored waypoints.  

Integrated child seats
As a safety and convenience feature for those carrying children in the Sharan, either one or two integrated child seats can be specified.  These act as a raised booster seat and are suitable for children weighing between 15 and 36 kgs, up to 12 years of age.  If one seat is specified, it is on the left-hand side of the middle row; if two are selected, they are incorporated into the two outer seats of the middle row.

SAFETY AND SECURITY

As already described in the design section of this press pack, over half of the Sharan’s structure consists of high-strength metal, and this has a notable effect on safety in all crash types.

Frontal impact
The structures in the deformation zone in front of the occupant cell absorb a large share of the impact energy.  The bumper beam − which is made of high-strength, hot-formed steel − ensures that in the case of an offset crash, the impact energy is redirected to the two longitudinal side members and is absorbed in these pathways.  The profile sections of the side members were designed to minimise occupant loads in the deceleration curve, and also work in tandem with the restraint systems.

To protect feet and legs, the cross-member in the area of the footwell is made of hot-formed material.  Engine and gearbox load forces on the cross-member are redirected to other areas of the body structure via the ‘tunnel’ − which is also produced from hot-formed material – and the side sills.

Parallel to the vehicle floor, the side wall and window sill framing provide other load paths for the occupant cell.  The hot-formed A-pillar that extends deep into the roof frame improves stability of the safety cell in serious accidents too.  By combining optimised deceleration and minimal intrusions, the body structure serves as the foundation for achieving the lowest possible loads on occupants in case of a frontal crash.

Side impact
The design of the Sharan’s crumple zones further reduces biomechanical loads on occupants, even in a side impact.  Since in this particularly dangerous type of crash load transmission is primarily via the B-pillar and the side sill, these components are also made from hot-formed steel.  The cross-member for the second seating row lying between the sill and tunnel also supports the B-pillar; thanks to its transverse rigidity, impact energy is diverted to the tunnel.  Special impact beams are integrated in the doors; their diagonal layout protects in crashes with vehicles of different heights.  These door reinforcements also serve to distribute a share of the crash energy to the surrounding body structure.

Rear impact
The rear body structure integrates the longitudinal side members in such a way that passengers in the second and third seating rows are optimally protected in a rear-end collision.  Normally, deformations occur in the area of the luggage space in this type of crash – and therefore outside the safety cell.

Pedestrian protection
In the bonnet area, the deformation space of the inner sheet metal was maximised to prevent impact on hard areas of the engine in case of an accident.  In parallel, the wings are mounted with deformation elements that will yield on impact.  Crumple zones were even created in the area of the windscreen cross-member.  The bumper cross-member is also equipped with a deformation element for high protection in the leg area.

Restraint systems
The Sharan’s passive safety was optimised by innovative restraint systems.  These include seven airbags (driver and front passenger airbags, two side airbags in the first seating rows, two side curtain airbags between the A- and D-pillars and one knee airbag on the driver’s side), as well as Isofix child seat mounts plus three-point belts for all occupants.  The second seating row can be optionally equipped with integrated child seats.

Standard on all Sharans is a Seat Belt Reminder (SBR) system for monitoring the front seatbelts.  On the passenger side, this is networked with the seat’s occupancy status: if the front passenger seat is occupied at a vehicle speed over 25 km/h, and the seatbelt is detected as unlatched, acoustic and visual warnings are given.  The SBR system also gives the driver an overview in the multifunction display of whether rear passengers have fastened their seatbelts.

The airbag system in the Sharan consists of an airbag controller with three internal sensors in the front area of the underbody tunnel, a front sensor in the area of the bonnet latch bracket, and four satellite sensors for side crash detection.  In the event of a crash the system not only triggers the airbags, but also communicates with other control modules to activate the hazard warning lights, unlock the doors, turn on the interior lights and deactivate the fuel pump.  An additional front sensor enables even earlier crash detection, contributing to optimal performance of the restraint systems.  To detect a side collision, an accelerometer is positioned at the transition node from the B-pillar to the side sill on each side of the vehicle, and another in the lower area of the C-pillar.  This layout enables detection of collisions affecting the rear area of the vehicle as well.

Euro NCAP test results
The new Sharan has yet to be tested under Euro NCAP (European New Car Assessment Programme). 

Line-up and insurance groups
Thanks to its impressive security and safety features, the Sharan has secured the following insurance group ratings from the ABI (Association of British Insurers):

S  
1.4-litre TSI 150 PS 16E
2.0-litre TDI 140 PS 18E
   
SE  
1.4-litre TSI 150 PS  16E
2.0-litre TDI 140 PS  18E
2.0-l itre TDI 170 PS   21E
   
SEL  
2.0-litre TSI 200 PS DSG TBC
2.0-litre TDI 140 PS 18E
2.0-litre TDI 170 PS 21E
   
Executive  
2.0-litre TDI 140 PS 18E

In December 2009, the insurance industry switched from a 1-20 rating system to a 1-50 system.  New ratings are shown here.  The ‘E’ denotes that the vehicle exceeded the Thatcham (ABI) requirements.

WARRANTIES

The Sharan has a three year (first and second year manufacturer operated, third year retailer operated) mechanical warranty.  In addition, it comes with a class-leading 12 year anti-perforation guarantee, three year paint warranty and a year’s membership of Volkswagen Assistance.  The latter can be extended at minimal cost to the customer.

(ends)

NewSharan – KT/1010

Volkswagen’s full-size people carrier, the Sharan, first went on sale in 1995.  Fifteen years later and after more than 600,000 sales, an all-new Sharan has been launched, offering maximum versatility, practicality, economy and technology. 

Revealed at the Geneva Motor Show in March 2010 and on sale in the UK in November, the new Sharan is 220 mm longer than the model it replaces, 92 mm wider and 12 mm lower.  Yet despite the gains in size and functionality, the new Sharan weighs up to 30 kg less than the model it replaces.

Key features of the new model include: seven seats with a new EasyFold seating concept, side sliding doors, a range of direct injection and highly economical petrol and diesel engines as well as a high standard specification and value for money.  As with all Volkswagen models, quality, reliability and safety are also core attributes.

The design of the new Sharan follows the latest Volkswagen ‘design DNA’.  Penned by a design team led by Walter de Silva and Klaus Bischoff, it incorporates a familiar ‘face’ with distinctive horizontal lines the main feature of its frontal appearance.  It is modern and stylish without being a design which would quickly become outdated. 

Four engines are available, two petrol and two diesel.  The petrol options comprise a 1.4-litre TSI developing 150 PS while returning 39.2 mpg and emitting 167 g/km of CO2; and a 2.0-litre unit developing 200 PS linked to a standard DSG gearbox which emits 198 g/km of CO2 while returning 33.2 mpg.  The diesel range consists of two 2.0-litre common rail engines producing 140 and 170 PS.  In 2.0-litre TDI 140 PS form the Sharan has a combined fuel consumption of 50.4 mpg with 146 g/km of CO2, making it one of the most efficient vehicles in its class.  The 1.4-litre TSI and 2.0-litre TDI 140 PS manual versions will be available from launch with other engine options following at the start of 2011.

Reinforcing Volkswagen’s commitment to producing economical vehicles, all Sharans except the 200 PS variant are designated BlueMotion Technology models and feature Stop/Start and battery regeneration systems as standard. 

Safety is a primary concern to drivers of people carriers and reflecting this, the Sharan comes well-equipped.  Standard safety equipment on all models includes ABS, Electronic Stabilisation Programme (ESP) and seven airbags including a knee airbag. 

Four trim levels will be offered in the UK: S, SE, SEL and an Executive version with six seats, aimed at the business market.

For maximum convenience, sliding doors are now standard and the EasyFold seating system incorporates easy access to the rear row of seats.  What’s more, the second generation of Park Assist is also available on the Sharan.  Not only does the new system require less space to perform automatic parallel parking manoeuvres, it also allows the Sharan to be parked in spaces at 90 degrees to the kerb.

The new Sharan will be built, like the previous generations, at the Volkswagen Autoeuropa plant in Palmela, Portugal alongside the Scirocco and Eos.

Volkswagen UK will sell around 350 Sharans in 2010, a number which will rise to around 3,400 in a full year.

SUMMARY

  • All-new Sharan was revealed at the Geneva Motor Show in March ahead of European launch in summer 2010; UK launch in November
  • Second generation Sharan takes over from the original, of which over 600,000 examples were built.  The Sharan first went on sale in 1995 and was substantially revised in May 2000
  • At 4,854 mm in length, the new Sharan is 220 mm longer than the model it replaces, 92 mm wider and 12 mm lower; despite these gains the new Sharan weighs up to 30 kg less than the previous model 
  • Designed by a team led by Klaus Bischoff, Head of Design for the Volkswagen brand, the Sharan’s new look is in line with the latest Volkswagen design DNA which is now familiar on the Golf and Polo
  • Two petrol options comprise a 1.4-litre TSI petrol engine developing 150 PS while returning 39.2 mpg and emitting 167 g/km of CO2; and a 2.0-litre unit developing 200 PS linked to a standard DSG gearbox which emits 198 g/km of CO2 while returning 33.2 mpg
  • The diesel range comprises two 2.0-litre common rail engines producing 140 and 170 PS.  In 2.0-litre TDI 140 PS form the Sharan has a combined fuel consumption of 50.4 mpg with 146 g/km of CO2, making it one of the most efficient vehicles in its class.  The 170 PS model emits 155 g/km of CO2 and returns 49.5 mpg (combined)
  • A choice of six-speed manual and DSG gearboxes is available in combination with all engines, except for the 2.0-litre TSI 200 PS which is offered with DSG only
  • The 1.4-litre TSI and 2.0-litre TDI 140 PS manual versions will be available from launch with other engine options following at the start of 2011
  • All Sharans except the 200 PS variant are designated BlueMotion Technology models and feature Stop/Start and battery regeneration systems as standard
  • Access to the rear seats in the new Sharan is granted via a pair of large sliding doors that can, along with the tailgate, be specified with electric motors to operate automatically
  • All Sharans have seven seats as standard.  The centre row features three individual seats that can be moved by up to 160 mm back and forth if required and, when not in use, can be easily folded to create a flat loadspace
  • A six seat version will also be available in Executive trim, featuring six individual leather seats with armrests which is likely to appeal to business users
  • Available as an option for the first time on the Sharan is the Adaptive Chassis Control (ACC) system featuring electronically controlled dampers with three selectable stages – normal, comfort and sport
  • A new version of Park Assist makes its debut on the Sharan.  The system is now capable of guiding the vehicle into parking spaces at right angles to the direction of traffic as well as parallel spaces
  • Standard safety equipment includes ABS, Electronic Stabilisation Programme (ESP) and nine airbags including a knee airbag
  • In the UK the Sharan will be offered in S, SE, SEL and Executive trim levels

Market information
The Sharan competes in the full-size MPV class, a direct rival to cars such as the Ford Galaxy and Renault Espace.  In the UK in 2009, this market segment accounted for sales of 22,700 vehicles.  In 2011, Volkswagen plans to sell 3,400 Sharans in the UK.

Nearly 97 per cent of Sharan buyers will opt for a diesel-engined model.  The best-selling model is predicted to be the S 2.0-litre TDI 140 PS, accounting for around 40 per cent of sales.  Over half of these models will be purchased with a DSG automatic gearbox.  Just over 30 per cent of customers will opt for this engine in the higher SE specification.

Production
The Sharan is produced at Volkswagen’s Autoeuropa plant in Palmela, Portugal, alongside the Scirocco and Eos models.

Autoeuropa represents the biggest foreign industrial investment in Portugal and is one of the most modern car production units in Europe.  The plant covers a total area of 2,000,000 square metres, of which 1,100,000 sq m are dedicated to production, and the remaining 900,000 sq m to the nearby industrial park.  Over 700 suppliers provide parts to Volkswagen Autoeuropa, using the ‘just in time’ production philosophy.  The plant produces around 400 vehicles per day.

The Autoeuropa plant was founded in 1991, as a 50/50 joint venture agreement between Ford and Volkswagen.  Production then began in 1995 of the Volkswagen Sharan, Ford Galaxy and SEAT Alhambra.  In 1999, Volkswagen assumed full ownership of the plant.  By 2003, the factory had produced one million MPVs.  In 2006, the Eos convertible coupé began to be built at Autoeuropa and at the same time, the production of the Ford Galaxy there ceased.

DESIGN

The new Sharan is a completely redesigned vehicle – in fact the only parts carried across from old to new were the sun visors.  This fundamental change is also reflected in the altered dimensions.  At 4.85 m, the new Sharan is now 22 cm longer.  At the same time, its width has increased by 9.4 cm to 1.9 m, yet height has fallen to 1.72 m giving a lower, wider stance and more powerful overall appearance.  

For the first time, the Sharan is also equipped with rear sliding doors and these can be specified with electric operation.  In construction, the Sharan sets a new benchmark in the segment for the static and dynamic torsional rigidity of its body.  Yet, despite this, weight has been reduced by up to 30 kg.   

Exterior
Responsible for the visual styling of the new Sharan are Walter de Silva (Head of Design for the Volkswagen Group) and Klaus Bischoff (Head of Design for the Volkswagen Brand).  They designed the MPV based on the new Volkswagen ‘design-DNA’ matrix.  As a result, the vehicle’s styling is epitomised by clear, horizontal lines, and encompasses a fresh look – but which is not a passing fashion.  The aim of the design is rather to create − with its balanced proportions and minimal lines − an ideal form for giving the body a dynamic and classic appearance.

Front styling
At the front, the dual headlights incorporated into the V-contour of the bonnet can be ordered in a standard H7 or bi-xenon version.  The H7 headlights are subdivided by a so-called masking plate into a larger area with dipped and main beam lights and a narrow lower section with daytime running and indicator lights.  The chrome-plated masking plates guide the horizontal lines of the front end into the headlights and give the Sharan a more concise overall appearance.

New H7 long-life halogen discharge lamps are used for the dipped lights, significantly increasing their service life.  The parking and daytime running lights − generally subjected to many hours of use − also use long-life or super long-life technology.  The reflector size of the dipped light and its optimal mounting height in the Sharan guarantee very good and widely distributed illumination of the carriageway.

If the Sharan is ordered with optional bi-xenon headlights, a newly designed LED daytime running and position light is included within the headlamp module.  It is made up of 15 individual LEDs arranged in a concise ‘light signature’ within the module.  The bi-xenon headlights are also equipped with dynamic cornering lights and a motorway function that automatically activates the lights at speeds above around 70 mph.  The xenon burners used here are Type D3S mercury-free lighting sources, which Volkswagen has implemented on all xenon headlights of its new models well ahead of their legally required introduction in 2012.

Rear styling
The Sharan’s rear look is just as clearly structured as that of the front.  The dominant visual elements here are the concise roof-edge spoiler, the deep tailgate (sill height: 0.67 m) and large rear lights which reflect the styling of the headlamps.  As on the previous model, the rear lights are designed as two-part units, but are much larger.  They extend from the D-pillar well into the tailgate and create an unmistakable night look in the form of a stylised “M”.  To reduce workshop time and enhance convenience, bulbs can easily be replaced by opening a small cap on the inside trim panel, where it is easy to loosen the central mounting screw for the lamp with a tool from the on-board toolkit.  On the right side of the vehicle, this cap is designed as a control panel with a 12V socket that can be pushed downwards together with the plug to gain access to the central mounting screw.

As an option, the Sharan’s boot can be specified with an electric opening and closing function.  In this case, opening and closing are controlled by a button in the tailgate handle, a switch on the centre console or a button on the remote control key.  Like the electrically-controlled side sliding doors, the electric tailgate is also equipped with pinch protection.  One advantage of the electric-powered option is that it makes opening and closing of the tailgate much easier for smaller adults (height from ground is 1.89 m).

Side profile
One of the Sharan’s distinctive features is its smooth side profile.  The designers also gave a unique feel to the side windows which sit relatively low on the vehicle, conveying a sense of transparency and airiness.  The bottom edge of the side windows rises dynamically at the front and rear, giving the roof’s A- and D-pillars a character of their own.  Designers refer to this as a ‘reverse angle’ – a design element that is also cited at the front and rear of the Sharan and matches that of other Volkswagen models.  The Sharan’s roof rails are integrated neatly into the side profile.

Side sliding doors
All new Sharans are equipped with two rear sliding doors which have been designed to open and close extremely smoothly.  As an option, they can be made to slide with an electric motor.  Here, the doors are electrically controlled by pressing one of the two buttons (one for the left door and one for the right) on the centre console in front of the gear shift grip, a button in each of the B-pillars or by grasping the door handles themselves.  The electric sliding doors may also be opened or closed via the remote control key.  To prevent accidental damage, if the fuel filler cap is open, the sliding door on the right cannot be opened from inside the vehicle in either the electric or manual version.  Both door versions include electric windows and fully retractable side windows.

To enhance practicality, the door handles are located to the left and right of the B-pillar, allowing either the driver or passenger to open the front or rear door with a single hand movement and without changing position.  Anyone with small children will appreciate this feature!  The fact that the sliding doors open to the rear also creates an extremely large aperture, offering easy access to the rear seating space.

The sliding doors each glide on three rails that run in the door sill area, in the side panel above the rear wheel housing and in the roof frame.  The rail in the roof frame is housed in a separate box that protects the rail from the elements.  The entirely free-standing B-pillars, which are visible when the front door and sliding door are opened, highlight the Sharan’s exceptional construction quality.

An important safety feature of the electric sliding doors is that opening and closing can be stopped at any time; this also means that the opening width can be modified.  A self-locking drive system is used, so the door is securely held in place even on a hill.  In addition, the electric sliding doors not only have a powerful drive but a power closing assist function integrated in the latch mechanism which securely closes the sliding doors even if the seals are iced.  It is necessary to monitor the forces applied here, which is why the doors are equipped with an efficient pinch control system.

The Sharan is one of the few vehicles of this type to have two protective systems working in parallel.  The first is located at the front edge of the sliding doors where a pinch protection strip in the seal reacts to any detected pressure.  The second protective system is implemented by an algorithm in the controller, which continually compares the ratio of the drive’s electrical current draw with the door’s drive speed to detect an obstacle.  If one of the doors encounters an object while closing, it automatically stops and reverses.  If an obstacle is detected while opening, it stops immediately.  In addition, a warning signal sounds whenever the doors are being closed.

Aerodynamics
The new Sharan is one of the world’s most fuel-efficient MPVs and this is thanks not only to efficient engines but also aerodynamics.  Its Cw value is 0.299 – a five per cent improvement over the previous model.  The aerodynamic properties of the new Sharan were studied and perfected in an early stage of development using computational flow analysis.  The results fed directly into the design of the first models, while in the next stage, aerodynamic specialists and designers refined the details further. 

The A-pillars, for example, incorporate an optimised water-trapping profile which diverts the air flow from the windscreen to the side windows with low losses – this detail contributes as much to low air drag as it does to low wind noises and good visibility of the outside mirrors when driving in the rain.  In parallel, the aerodynamics of the mirrors and their mounts were fine-tuned, resulting in a design which offers very little resistance to the wind, produces little wind noise and maintains the cleanliness of the mirrors.  They also reduce water flow over the side windows when driving in rain, which improves visibility and safety.

Aerodynamic parameters even influenced the design of the side skirts: they optimise air flow over the rear wheels, minimising drag.  The spoiler and underbody panels are also designed to direct the flow of air under the Sharan with low losses, reducing drag and improving the cooling of the powertrain and brakes.  In the rear, a roof spoiler reduces air turbulence.

Construction
In designing the new Sharan, Volkswagen’s engineers set out to create a safe, refined and strong vehicle.  This would normally mean the weight of the body structure increasing to 438 kg to attain the new car’s significantly improved crash properties and heightened rigidity requirements, as well as to increase the vehicle’s length and integrate two sliding doors.

But the body structure’s weight was actually decreased by more than 10 per cent to 389 kg thanks to the use of innovative materials and production methods.  The largest share of weight reduction can be attributed to hot-formed steels, which are used generously in the underbody structure, the B-pillars and the roof frame.  Just by integrating roof frame components hot-formed as tailored blanks, weight was reduced by 1.4 kg.

The excellent properties of hot-formed components are obtained in a manufacturing process in which the plate is heated to a glowing red, formed in one draw, and then cooled in the transformation tool in a defined process.  These components are used in areas subject to extremely high crash stresses, so that the survival space of the occupant cage is protected even in severe collisions.  Thirteen per cent of the weight of the body-in-white is taken up by this material, achieving a weight saving of about 26 kg.

Another important weight-saving measure was reducing the material thickness of less stressed parts, such as outer skin parts, without compromising their functional properties or high-quality appearance; an additional 11 kg was cut here.

What’s more, the Sharan’s exceptionally rigid body meets the highest standards for acoustic and vibration behaviour.  This is attributable to an innovative layout of nodes and force absorption points.  The available space is exploited by a body structure that is built up in three shells; the overall occupant cell is enclosed in computer-optimised profiles.  This improved the vehicle’s lightweight construction factor − a measure of efficient weight utilisation − by 40 per cent compared to the previous model, despite clearly elevated crash requirements and larger vehicle dimensions.

Given this reduction in weight, it is all the more remarkable that the Sharan’s static torsional rigidity of 22,400 Nm/° is class-leading.  The same is true of the dynamic rigidity of the body structure.  The Sharan’s static rigidity was increased by 63 per cent compared to the previous model.  All these improvements benefit noise reduction, refinement, driving comfort and safety.  More details on performance and crash-optimised construction can be found in the Safety section of this press pack.

Interior design – seating
The new Sharan is both practical and highly versatile.  In the UK, customers can choose between a standard seven-seat version and a six-seater which is available in Executive trim with leather upholstery and aimed at the business market.

Thanks to the new EasyFold seat concept, the individual seats of the second and third seating rows no longer need to be removed from the vehicle when not needed; they can simply be stowed in the vehicle floor with an easy-to-use folding mechanism.  Like the front seats, the second row rear seats also adjust longitudinally and over backrest angles of up to 20 degrees.  

Front row
One of the best features of the previous Sharan was the upright, comfortable sitting position of driver and front seat passenger, and engineers have taken this further for the new generation.  The seat position was made sportier with a slightly lower seat height (321 mm), so that − in conjunction with the clear cockpit layout, the slightly more tilted steering wheel (28 degrees) and positions of the centre armrest and gear shift − a comfortable sitting and driving position can be attained.  For the first time, a 12-way electrically adjustable seat, including driver’s side memory function, is now available as an option on the Sharan. 

Despite the new Sharan’s lower overall height, headroom has been increased: driver and passenger each now have 1,077 mm, which is 16 mm more than before.

Middle row
The design of the second row of seats has also been completely revised.  The individual seats here can be adjusted 160 mm fore and aft, and they now provide much more legroom thanks to changes such as a 58 mm increase in seat height to 373 mm.  Headroom, meanwhile, was increased by 14 mm to 973 mm.  An important point for families is that the two outer seats can be ordered with integrated child seats which offer younger passengers (aged three and above) optimal safety and comfort.  A simple mechanism is used to adjust the vertical height of the seating surface for children, while special lateral seat supports hold them snugly in place.  When the Sharan is ordered with a child seat, that seating position is automatically equipped with a belt tensioner.  The seats in the second and third rows are all equipped with Isofix brackets to mount detachable child seats.  The sliding doors may also be ordered with sun shades to protect small children in the second seating row from sunlight.

It is very easy to stow the seats in the second row to create a level cargo floor: activating the seat backrest handle folds the backrest onto the seat surface, while the seat is simultaneously lowered into the foot room floor in a forward direction by the so-called ‘Dive-Down’ kinematics.  As safe as they are practical are the redesigned rear head restraints which can be raised to offer optimal protection for tall people; or, when not in use, lowered to be nearly flush with the tops of the seat backs.  Crucially, this means that they do not need to be removed before folding the seats completely forward.

Third row
Getting into the third row of seats has been made much easier thanks not only to wide-opening sliding doors but also an Easy Entry function which enables the outer seats on the second row to be pushed forward and tilted.  

While the two rear seats in MPVs are generally reserved for children, the 75 mm longer wheelbase of the new Sharan (at 2.92 m) means that adults can ride comfortably in these seats over moderate distances.  Maximum headroom in the third row is 945 mm.

Bootspace
No matter which of the seats in the back are folded down, what is always produced is a totally level surface for loading luggage.  Even if just the third row of seats is folded down with the easy-to-use, single hand mechanism, this frees up a space 1.3 m deep.  Loaded to the top edge of the seat backrests, luggage capacity of the seven-seat Sharan is 711 litres.  Thanks to an easily fitted mesh partition, the Sharan can be loaded up to the roof without any safety concerns.  In this case, the luggage capacity increases to 1,167 litres.

If the seats in the second row are stowed, this produces a continuous luggage space, which – measured to the backrests of the front seats – is 2.1 m long.  With the luggage area extended to this maximum length, the seven-seater’s cargo capacity, loaded to the roof, is up to 2,297 litres.  A new cargo management system, located behind the second and third seating rows, securely holds luggage in place.  The system consists of two movable telescopic rails anchored in the sidewalls that are extremely easy to unlock and lock by turning, and a net stretched between them.  In addition, the system provides further lashing points for securing items such as bags on the side walls.

Storage
Whether it is used for family or for business, the new Sharan is a practical MPV and nowhere is this more obvious than in its array of storage compartments.  These are located in the doors, the roof liner, under the front seats and in front of the second row seats as well as in the luggage space.  When the new cargo management system is included, the Sharan has up to 33 different storage options.  Typical of this is the large storage bin on the dashboard which has a volume of 3.2 litres.  The standard, extendable centre armrest between the front seats also houses a storage compartment.  Bottles of up to 1.5-litres in size can be stowed in the front doors, while the sliding doors can handle bottles with a capacity of 1.0-litre.  Two can or cup holders in the front and in the second seating row are also ideally placed.

Controls
The basic layout of the Sharan’s dashboard has been completely redesigned.  Although key instruments, such as switches for the lights and the climate control system, are still in almost identical positions, they are now much easier to see and operate.  Like the exterior, the interior dashboard features a strictly horizontal layout, with a distinctive trim running between its upper and lower sections from the driver’s side to the passenger’s side.  All materials used in the new Sharan’s cabin are of a high quality, with soft surfaces made using so-called ‘slush technology’ and extensive use of metal accents on air vents and switch surrounds.

The centre console has been consciously ‘pulled out’ a considerable distance towards the gearshift lever as well as raised up, so that it lies within an ideal operating radius for the driver and passenger.  It houses the various audio, video and navigation systems, plus – arranged below these – controls for the climate control system.  A touchscreen display is added for the navigation systems and premium audio system when specified. 

Located below the display, and ideally positioned so that it is easy to reach, is the switch for the hazard warning lights.  Above it is a large storage compartment.  The lower-most level of the centre console contains another row of switches for functions such as opening and closing the optional electrically operated sliding doors, the ACC Adaptive Chassis Control system and Park Assist.  If the Sharan has been ordered with the ‘Keyless Access’ automatic locking and starting system, the engine start button is located directly in front of the gear lever on the centre console.

Located in its customary position between the seats is the handbrake; however, it is no longer a lever, rather – since the handbrake is now electronically activated across the model range – it is simply a switch.  Just behind it is the switch for activating the auto hold function, which is new to the Sharan and prevents unintentional vehicle rolling, for example at traffic lights.

The speedometer and rev counter, the two central round instruments, are easy to read and rimmed in silver.  When the lights are on they are backlit in white.  The Sharan’s multifunction display is arranged between the round instruments

Climate control
All Sharans come as standard with a 3Zone electronic climate control system which allows driver and front-seat passenger to adjust their own climates individually and independently as well as heating and ventilation for rear passengers

As an alternative, Sharan customers can upgrade the 3Zone system to have additional rear controls.  Here, three zones – driver, front passenger and rear seats – can specify individual temperatures and control air blower speeds.  In the second seating row, there is a separate control unit (at the rear of the centre console), while nozzles on the dashboard and in the roof area of the second and third seating rows deliver the air to individual seats. 

To make this system function effectively, these vehicles have an externally controlled compressor, while total system power was also significantly improved.  Load-based control of the compressor as a function of power demand also has a positive effect on system efficiency.  Developed using the latest flow simulation methods, the air distribution system and air conditioning units were designed to reduce electrical drive power while improving climate comfort in the passenger compartment.  In part, this has been achieved by uniform air distribution at low air flow speed.  Individual air flow paths were also optimised to reduce flow resistance, while at the same time, thermal energy losses through air duct walls were minimised.  As a result, the Sharan’s new climate control systems make a contribution towards lower fuel consumption and emissions.

Also helping enhance economy and reduce emissions is a new approach to defogging in the Sharan.  Where previous systems have run the air conditioning compressor constantly in order to dehumidify the interior and hence reduce misting up, the new Sharan detects the likelihood of fogging by comparing the air and windscreen temperatures, and only engaging the compressor when necessary.  The related sensor – a multi-purpose device that detects rain, light and humidity – is located at the base of the rear-view mirror.

ENGINES

The Sharan is available with a choice of four engines: two petrol units – a 1.4-litre TSI 150 PS and a 2.0-litre TSI 200 PS; plus two 2.0-litre diesels offering 140 or 170 PS.  All are available with a choice of six-speed manual or DSG automatic gearboxes, except the 200 PS petrol unit which is only offered with a DSG transmission.

All except the 200 PS petrol engine are also badged BlueMotion Technology and incorporate Stop/Start and battery regeneration systems in order to reduce fuel consumption and emissions.

Stop/Start
The Sharan’s automatic Stop/Start system is operated through the clutch pedal.  When coming to a halt at traffic lights, for example, the driver depresses the clutch and selects neutral.  When the clutch is released, the engine shuts down and a ‘Start / Stop’ symbol illuminates on the multifunction display.  In order to move away, the driver simply depresses the clutch once again to select first gear and the engine restarts automatically.  On DSG variants, the engine shuts down and restarts in response to the brake pedal.  The system can be deactivated through a switch, if necessary.

Battery regeneration
A battery regeneration system helps to utilise energy that would otherwise be lost during braking.  In deceleration and braking phases, the alternator’s voltage is boosted and used for bulk recharging of the car’s battery.  Thanks to alternator control, it is possible to lower alternator voltage, for example during deceleration or driving at a constant speed.  It is even possible to switch off the alternator entirely which reduces engine load and improves fuel consumption.

Petrol engines

TSI technology
In June 2006, Volkswagen launched the latest in a line of innovations with the introduction of TSI petrol technology.  Previous engines have used FSI technology, whereby petrol is injected directly into the combustion chamber to improve efficiency and hence reduce fuel consumption and emissions.  Taking this further, TSI can use – for the first time ever in a production car – an FSI engine which is then dual-charged through a combination of an engine driven supercharger and an exhaust gas turbocharger arranged in series.  Alternatively, lower powered TSI units use simply a sophisticated turbocharger.

The driving characteristics of TSI engines are improved over those of a conventional FSI unit.  With twincharged versions, the belt-driven supercharger on the higher-powered derivatives operates at the lower engine speeds, with the turbocharger coming in as engine speed increases.  The result of this is excellent driveability and performance throughout the range with no turbo lag and high maximum torque.

Key to the TSI’s success is that direct injection allows an abnormally high compression ratio of 10:1 to be used in conjunction with high maximum boost pressure of up to 2.5 bar absolute.  This enables the relatively small engine to use very high gearing to provide exceptional fuel efficiency for a petrol engine, particularly at motorway cruising speeds.  As an additional bonus, the TSI engine provides driver enjoyment, producing high power and torque across a rev range from 1,000 to 6,500 rpm.

TSI technology has received international acclaim, with, among other awards, the 1.4-litre TSI claiming the title of International Engine of the Year for the past two years.

1.4-litre TSI, 1390 cc, 16-valve 4-cyl, 150 PS
This engine produces 150 PS at 5,800 rpm and 240 Nm (177 lbs ft) of torque from 2,000, offering flexible and impressive performance.  It has a zero to 62 mph time of 10.7 seconds and a top speed of 122 mph.  Combined economy is 39.2 mpg with the standard six-speed manual gearbox and CO2 emissions are 167 g/km.

2.0-litre TSI, 1968 cc, 16-valve 4-cyl, 200 PS
The range-topping engine in the Sharan line-up, this unit produces 200 PS at 6,000 rpm and 280 Nm (207 lbs ft) from 1,800 rpm.  Although it is designated a ‘TSI’ engine, it is boosted simply by a turbocharger and intercooler, and is not twincharged.  This engine, offered with a six-speed DSG gearbox, returns 33.2 mpg on the combined cycle and carbon dioxide emissions of 198 g/km.

Diesel engines
All new Sharans use Volkswagen’s common rail diesel technology, ensuring they are frugal, clean and quiet in operation.  Naturally they all comply with Euro5 emissions standards.  

For the first time on a Volkswagen passenger car, the Sharan uses an SCR (selective catalytic reduction) catalytic converter together with an additive, the synthetically-produced, water-based urea solution containing 32.5 per cent urea, AdBlue.  Together, SCR and AdBlue lead to a significant reduction in nitrogen oxide emissions.  ‘Selective’ refers to the way the catalytic converter selectively converts nitrogen oxide (NOx) components in the exhaust system into nitrogen and water without producing undesirable by-products. 

Stored in an auxiliary 17 litre tank housed in the left wheelhousing, the AdBlue solution is continuously sprayed into the exhaust gas, upstream of the SCR catalytic converter.  The rate of spray is metered via engine management according to the mass flow rate of the exhaust gas using a NOx sensor downstream of the SCR catalytic converter.  Atomised into a fine vapour through a screen, the urea in the AdBlue is converted in the hot exhaust gas upstream of the catalytic converter, reacting with the nitrogen oxides and splitting them into nitrogen and water.

AdBlue is water-based, non-toxic, odour-free and biodegradable, and on average, 0.1 litres of AdBlue are used per 100 km (62 miles).  AdBlue is refilled as part of the standard servicing regime.

All Sharan TDIs also feature an oxidation catalytic converter and diesel particulate filter (DPF) to reduce other potentially harmful emissions.  The DPF is self-regenerating and requires no routine maintenance.

2.0-litre TDI common rail engine
Fuel injection for the Sharan’s two 1,968 cc diesel engines is handled by the latest generation common rail system, with up to 1,800 bar injection pressure and special injection nozzles delivering especially fine atomisation of the fuel.  Control of the eight-hole injection nozzles is achieved by the latest generation of piezo in-line injectors.  Electrically-controlled piezo crystals, assisted by a hydraulic element, inject the right amount of fuel in just fractions of a second.  Compared with conventional solenoid valves, piezo technology enables more flexible injection processes with smaller and more precisely metered fuel volumes.  This leads to a very quiet and smooth running engine and exceptionally quick throttle response with low fuel consumption and emissions.

2.0-litre TDI, 1968 cc, 16-valve 4-cyl, 140 PS
The predicted best-seller – the 2.0-litre TDI 140 PS – produces 140 PS at 4,200 rpm and 320 Nm (236 lbs ft) of torque from 1,750 rpm; it is available with a six-speed manual or DSG gearbox.  It has a zero to 62 mph time of 10.9 seconds and a top speed of 121 mph (119 DSG).  Despite its strong performance credentials, fuel consumption remains impressive with a combined figure of 50.4 mpg (49.6 DSG) and CO2 emissions of 146 g/km (149 DSG). 

2.0-litre TDI, 1968 cc, 16-valve 4-cyl, 170 PS
The most powerful diesel Sharan produces 170 PS at 4,200 rpm and maximum torque of 350 Nm (258 lbs ft) from 1,750 to 2,500 rpm.  This car accelerates from zero to 62 mph in 9.5 seconds and goes on to a top speed of 130 mph.  Available with a six-speed manual or DSG gearbox, this engine returns a combined fuel economy figure of 48.7 mpg (47.9 DSG) and carbon dioxide emissions of 153 g/km (154 DSG).

Gearboxes

Six-speed manual
All Sharans (except the 2.0-litre TSI 200 PS) come as standard with a six-speed manual gearbox.  A wider spread of ratios than is possible with a five-speed transmission not only benefits fuel consumption, but also makes the Sharan more responsive.  These gearboxes are filled with lifetime oil and need no routine maintenance.

This transmission has a magnesium shift housing, is cable-operated and has short lever movements, with three-cone synchromesh for the lower gears ensuring a pleasant shift action.  Reduced-friction bearings further increase the gearbox’s efficiency and cut fuel consumption.

DSG – Direct Shift Gearbox
Available as an option with all engines and standard on the 2.0-litre TSI 200 PS is a six-speed Direct Shift Gearbox (DSG).  DSG is a true innovation, combining the comfort of an automatic gearbox with the agility and economy of a manual unit. 

The six-speed, transversely mounted DSG has two wet clutches (offering a higher thermal load tolerance than dry clutches) with hydraulic pressure regulation.  One clutch controls the ‘odd’ gears plus reverse, while the other operates the ‘even’ gears.  Essentially it is two gearboxes in one.

With this new clutch management system, the breaks in power that are typical of even an automatic-shift manual gearbox no longer occur.  This is achieved by an intelligent hydraulic and electronic (mechatronic) gearbox control system, the two wet-type clutches and the two input and output shafts in each half of the gearbox.

This combination enables the next-higher gear ratio to remain engaged but on standby until it is actually selected.  In other words, if the car is being driven in third gear, fourth is selected but not yet activated.  As soon as the ideal shift point is reached, the clutch on the third-gear side opens, the other clutch closes and fourth gear engages under accurate electronic supervision.  Since the opening and closing actions of the two clutches overlap, a smooth gearshift results and the entire shift process is completed in less than four-hundredths of a second.

Servicing
Volkswagen offers customers a choice of servicing regime for their Sharan.  They can choose Time and Distance or LongLife Servicing and the appropriate selection is entirely dependent on how the car is likely to be driven and its use. 

Time and Distance Servicing is recommended for vehicles that will cover less than 10,000 miles in 12 months and if the vehicle is likely to be used in:

  • Predominantly city centre driving, short journeys with frequent cold starts
  • Activities regularly producing high engine loading, for example frequent hill climbs, driving with vehicle fully loaded and towing
  • Driving with high rpm, hard acceleration and heavy braking

In this case, the vehicle will be serviced at regular intervals, at every 10,000 miles or every 12 months. 

LongLife Servicing is recommended for vehicles with a daily mileage of more than 25 miles, where the vehicle is driven regularly and on mainly longer distance journeys.  The vehicle should be mainly driven at a constant speed with minimum vehicle and engine loading, minimal towing and driven in an economical manner.  In this case, the on-board computer informs the driver via a dashboard display, when the vehicle needs a service.  A range of engine sensors electronically monitors the vehicle’s oil temperature, oil pressure, oil level and brake pad wear to establish when a service is needed. 

With the LongLife system, the vehicle can cover typically between 10,000 and 18,000 miles (approx) or 24 months (whichever is sooner) between oil changes.  An inspection service is typically due in the third year of ownership or at 40,000 miles and thereafter every second year for vehicles with an annual mileage of around 10,000 miles.

Customers can choose between Time and Distance or LongLife Servicing at PDI (pre-delivery inspection) and though it is possible to change from one to another during the vehicle’s life, it can only be done when a full inspection service is due.

RUNNING GEAR

In designing the Sharan’s chassis, engineers set out to find the ideal balance between driving dynamics and driving comfort. To achieve this aim, they made use of Volkswagen’s modular system, employing components from both the Tiguan and Passat’s chassis, and redefining them for the MPV. 

The result is a front strut-type suspension system and a four-link axle at the rear, permitting the greatest combination of comfort and stability to be achieved.  To guarantee the required payloads, certain axle components such as the subframe and suspension links of the rear axle were reinforced. 

The subframe of the rear axle was also broadened (track width increased by 50 mm compared to Passat) in order to allow the appropriate amount of room to accommodate the third row of seats.  In addition, the subframe has new rubber mountings to enhance comfort and reduce noise levels.

Adaptive Chassis Control – ACC
For the first time, the Sharan is available with Volkswagen’s Adaptive Chassis Control system, ACC. 

Engineers have in the past been constrained to design a suspension system which is biased either towards comfort or sportiness, always resulting in some form of compromise.  The ideal, it was decided, would be to produce a chassis that could continually adapt to road conditions and the particular wishes of the driver or passengers.  This has been achieved by employing an Adaptive Chassis Control (ACC) system.  Here not only can the suspension’s damping characteristics be controlled at the touch of a button, but the electro-mechanical power steering and accelerator response are also modified at the same time.

ACC functions via a set of four electrically adjustable dampers operated through pneumatic valves.  Each damper is fitted with characteristic map control, a gateway control module that serves as an interface with the CAN data networks in the Sharan – these comprise three sensors for measuring wheel displacement, three sensors for measuring movements of the body structure and a control module for the damping.

These sensors constantly (up to 1,000 times per second) measure the vehicle’s behaviour – be it under braking, acceleration or cornering – and react almost instantaneously to ensure the optimum mix of chassis agility and comfort at all times.  The vehicle defaults to ‘Normal’ mode in which the system strikes a balance for general use.  Should the driver select ‘Sport’ mode the steering assistance is reduced, the damping is hardened and the throttle responses are sharpened as the mapping changes.  This is intended for either twisty roads or track driving.  In ‘Comfort’ the damping is softened and the steering assistance is increased to provide a smooth and controlled ride best suited to motorway driving.

Electro-mechanical power steering
For the first time, the Sharan now benefits from electro-mechanical power steering.  Unlike some similar steering systems, the Sharan’s is able to vary the steering feel to suit the speed and driving situation: firm and direct when driving hard, effortless at parking speeds.  Other advantages of the system include its mild self-centring action, its ability to compensate for different driving hazards such as crosswinds and steep road cambers, and a beneficial effect on fuel economy.

Braking system
Standard equipment on all Sharans is Volkswagen’s Electronic Stabilisation Programme with counter steering support, which includes an anti-lock braking system (ABS), electronic differential lock (EDL), traction control (ASR) and Hydraulic Brake Assist (HBA).

Electronic Stabilisation Programme (ESP) with counter-steering support and trailer stabilisation
Essentially, ESP is a sophisticated system that automatically senses any tendency for the car to slide.  Should this situation occur, ESP reacts by applying the brakes to one, two, three or all four wheels and adjusts the engine’s power.  In this way, it is possible that a skid is corrected even before the driver is aware that one has started. 

This can be useful if a tendency to understeer or oversteer develops in a bend.  In such circumstances ESP can help prevent the car skidding or spinning off the road and is particularly helpful in wet or icy conditions. 

The latest generation of ESP fitted to the new Sharan has a finer response, counter-steering recommendation and offers trailer stabilisation. 

This function can be activated by a Volkswagen Retailer when a Volkswagen-approved towbar is fitted.  This system extends the capability of the normal ESP purely through a software extension.  It does not require additional sensors. 

When the onset of yawing of a trailer is detected by the ESP control module the system automatically reduces or cuts engine power and applies the brakes to appropriate wheels dynamically in phase with the yawing to oppose the snaking motion and stabilise the vehicle/trailer combination.  When stability is achieved the brakes and engine power return to normal control.  During the automatic braking process the brake lights are turned on even though the driver may not be touching the brake pedal.

Hydraulic Brake Assist – HBA
Working in conjunction with the other elements of the braking system, this latest form of HBA recognises from the speed at which the brake pedal is depressed whether it is a ‘normal’ braking situation or an emergency stop.  In the event of an emergency stop, HBA increases braking pressure, activating ABS and ensuring the level of braking meets the needs of the conditions.  The application of brake assist makes it possible even for unskilled drivers to reduce braking distances by around 25 per cent.   

Electronic Parking Brake with auto hold function
All new Sharans have an electronic parking brake with standard auto hold function.  A separate control unit, which is linked with the ESP control unit and therefore a part of the Controller Area Network (CAN), is needed to actuate and monitor the electro-mechanical parking brake.  This is important, because it means that all the convenience and safety functions of the electro-mechanical parking brake can be perfectly controlled, offering noticeable advantages over a conventional handbrake. 

The auto hold function is activated by a button near the gear lever and is useful when the car is regularly stopping for short periods, for example when driving in heavy traffic.  In this case, the parking brake is applied automatically whenever the vehicle is brought to rest on the footbrake, preventing it from rolling forwards or backwards.  The brake is then released as soon as the accelerator is pressed.

EQUIPMENT AND TRIM

The Sharan is offered in three different trim levels: S, SE, SEL and Executive.  Key items of specification for each trim level are shown below, while comprehensive details can be found in the price list at www.vwpress.co.uk.

S 1.4-litre TSI 150 PS
S 2.0-litre TDI 140 PS

  • ABSanti-lock brakes with HBA (Hydraulic Brake Assist)
  • ESP(Electronic Stabilisation Programme), including ASR (traction control) and EDL (Electronic Differential Lock)
  • alarm with interior monitoring
  • parking brake with auto hold
  • electric child locks for rear doors
  • electric windows front and rear
  • driver and front passenger airbags; driver’s knee airbag
  • side airbag along all three rows of seats
  • driver’s seat height adjustment; front centre armrest
  • 3Zone electronic climate control
  • RCD 310 radio/CD player with eight speakers
  • MDI (Multi-Device Interface) with iPod connectivity
  • DABdigital radio receiver
  • tyre pressure monitor
  • tonneau cover
  • 6½J x 16 steel wheels with 205/60 R16 self-sealing tyres

SE 1.4-litre TSI 150 PS
SE 2.0-litre TDI 140 PS
SE 2.0-litre TDI 170 PS 

Different from or in addition to S models, SE models feature:

  • multifunction steering wheel
  • cruise control
  • automatic dimming rear-view mirror with rain sensor
  • coming and leaving home lighting function
  • under-seat drawers for driver and front passenger
  • height adjustment for both front seats (manual) with electric back rest adjustment
  • load through function for front passenger seat
  • parking sensors, front and rear
  • mobile rubbish container
  • Bluetooth preparation for Hands Free Profile enabled telephones
  • chrome trim
  • 6½J x 16 ‘Memphis’ alloy wheels with 215/60 R16 self-sealing (run flat) tyres and anti-theft bolts

SEL 2.0-litre TSI 200 PS DSG
SEL 2.0-litre TDI 140 PS
SEL 2.0-litre TDI 170 PS

At the top of the range, SEL models gain:

  • sport comfort seats with Alcantara upholstery, heated front seats
  • 65 per cent tinted rear glass
  • heated windscreen washer jets
  • brushed aluminium decorative inserts
  • RCD 510 radio/CD autochanger with eight speakers
  • entry warning lights in front doors
  • front fog lights with turning light
  • panoramic sunroof
  • chrome roof rails
  • 7J x 17 ‘Sydney’ alloy wheels with 225/50 R17 self-sealing (run flat) tyres and anti-theft bolts

Executive 2.0-litre TDI 140 PS
Aimed at the high-end business market, the Executive has all the features of the SEL but has six seats with individual armrests and full ‘Vienna’ leather upholstery.

FACTORY-FIT OPTIONS

A number of factory- and retailer-fit options are available for the Sharan, allowing buyers further to customise their vehicles.  These include alloy wheel upgrades, Adaptive Chassis Control, a cargo management system, keyless entry, Park Assist, satellite navigation and audio upgrades.  For full details of availability and prices please see the latest price list.

Park Assist
Park Assist is an automated steering assistance system for parallel parking and reverse parking into spaces at 90 degrees to the road.  Using a series of sensors mounted on the front, rear and side of the Sharan, the system plots the ideal manoeuvring path into a parallel space measuring less than one metre more than the Sharan, either to the right or left of the vehicle. 

When driving at speeds of under around 18 mph and within an appropriate parking environment, an ultrasonic sensor system detects spaces.  A control unit then notifies the driver an appropriate space has been found and calculates the ideal parking path.  Once in the recommended ‘start’ position, the driver engages reverse gear.  During the parking process the driver has no steering input – he or she simply accelerates and brakes as appropriate.  Once reverse gear is engaged, the whole operation generally takes no more than 15 seconds. 

This system also incorporates audible parking sensors with volume reduction when activated and optical parking display via the vehicle’s audio system. 

In addition, it can also be specified to include a rear-view camera which transmits a real-time, distortion-free image of what is behind the car to the screen in the central display.  This allows the driver to see and recognise obstacles behind the car, and manoeuvre into the tightest parking spaces.  While moving, the screen marks out the car’s steering movements with coloured orientation lines.  This facility can also be extremely useful when hooking up to a tow hitch. 

Parking sensors
Optional on S models and standard on all others, is a parking distance control system.  This uses four ultrasonic sensors, integrated in the rear bumper, to pinpoint parked vehicles or other objects behind the car.  Automatically activated when reverse gear is selected, the system produces an audible warning signal to guide the driver up to a safe distance to any objects behind.  It also incorporates an optical parking display via the vehicle’s audio system. 

RNS 315 touchscreen satellite navigation/radio system
All Sharans can be specified with Volkswagen’s new RNS 315 satellite navigation system.  The installation uses a five-inch touchscreen for fast, intuitive operation of the entertainment and navigation menus and displaying of information.  Key features include a CD drive for navigation disc or audio CDs, playback with title display for MP3 files and an integrated SD memory card reader from which files can be retrieved.

The navigation function offers a moving map in the colour display panel, integrated direction symbols as well as spoken instructions. 

For the navigation to function, rear ABS wheel sensors are used to determine the distance the car has covered and to provide information when the car is turning.  Further system components include a solid state magnetic compass concealed under the roof and a three-way roof aerial for radio and GPS (Global Positioning System).  The aerial receives signals from the satellites in orbit from which the system is able to calculate the position of the car on the surface of the earth.

RNS 510 DVD touchscreen satellite navigation/radio system
Also available on all Sharans is the RNS 510 satellite navigation system.  This features a six and a half inch colour screen plus integrated voice control system which responds to spoken voice commands for navigation, CD and radio functions.

As well as playing CDs in the usual manner, favourite tracks can also be stored onto the internal, 30 GB hard-drive via an SD card slot in the front of the unit.  The hard-drive can also be used to store navigation mapping.  In addition routes can be recorded while driving and then re-traced by following guidance provided by the stored waypoints.  

Integrated child seats
As a safety and convenience feature for those carrying children in the Sharan, either one or two integrated child seats can be specified.  These act as a raised booster seat and are suitable for children weighing between 15 and 36 kgs, up to 12 years of age.  If one seat is specified, it is on the left-hand side of the middle row; if two are selected, they are incorporated into the two outer seats of the middle row.

SAFETY AND SECURITY

As already described in the design section of this press pack, over half of the Sharan’s structure consists of high-strength metal, and this has a notable effect on safety in all crash types.

Frontal impact
The structures in the deformation zone in front of the occupant cell absorb a large share of the impact energy.  The bumper beam − which is made of high-strength, hot-formed steel − ensures that in the case of an offset crash, the impact energy is redirected to the two longitudinal side members and is absorbed in these pathways.  The profile sections of the side members were designed to minimise occupant loads in the deceleration curve, and also work in tandem with the restraint systems.

To protect feet and legs, the cross-member in the area of the footwell is made of hot-formed material.  Engine and gearbox load forces on the cross-member are redirected to other areas of the body structure via the ‘tunnel’ − which is also produced from hot-formed material – and the side sills.

Parallel to the vehicle floor, the side wall and window sill framing provide other load paths for the occupant cell.  The hot-formed A-pillar that extends deep into the roof frame improves stability of the safety cell in serious accidents too.  By combining optimised deceleration and minimal intrusions, the body structure serves as the foundation for achieving the lowest possible loads on occupants in case of a frontal crash.

Side impact
The design of the Sharan’s crumple zones further reduces biomechanical loads on occupants, even in a side impact.  Since in this particularly dangerous type of crash load transmission is primarily via the B-pillar and the side sill, these components are also made from hot-formed steel.  The cross-member for the second seating row lying between the sill and tunnel also supports the B-pillar; thanks to its transverse rigidity, impact energy is diverted to the tunnel.  Special impact beams are integrated in the doors; their diagonal layout protects in crashes with vehicles of different heights.  These door reinforcements also serve to distribute a share of the crash energy to the surrounding body structure.

Rear impact
The rear body structure integrates the longitudinal side members in such a way that passengers in the second and third seating rows are optimally protected in a rear-end collision.  Normally, deformations occur in the area of the luggage space in this type of crash – and therefore outside the safety cell.

Pedestrian protection
In the bonnet area, the deformation space of the inner sheet metal was maximised to prevent impact on hard areas of the engine in case of an accident.  In parallel, the wings are mounted with deformation elements that will yield on impact.  Crumple zones were even created in the area of the windscreen cross-member.  The bumper cross-member is also equipped with a deformation element for high protection in the leg area.

Restraint systems
The Sharan’s passive safety was optimised by innovative restraint systems.  These include seven airbags (driver and front passenger airbags, two side airbags in the first seating rows, two side curtain airbags between the A- and D-pillars and one knee airbag on the driver’s side), as well as Isofix child seat mounts plus three-point belts for all occupants.  The second seating row can be optionally equipped with integrated child seats.

Standard on all Sharans is a Seat Belt Reminder (SBR) system for monitoring the front seatbelts.  On the passenger side, this is networked with the seat’s occupancy status: if the front passenger seat is occupied at a vehicle speed over 25 km/h, and the seatbelt is detected as unlatched, acoustic and visual warnings are given.  The SBR system also gives the driver an overview in the multifunction display of whether rear passengers have fastened their seatbelts.

The airbag system in the Sharan consists of an airbag controller with three internal sensors in the front area of the underbody tunnel, a front sensor in the area of the bonnet latch bracket, and four satellite sensors for side crash detection.  In the event of a crash the system not only triggers the airbags, but also communicates with other control modules to activate the hazard warning lights, unlock the doors, turn on the interior lights and deactivate the fuel pump.  An additional front sensor enables even earlier crash detection, contributing to optimal performance of the restraint systems.  To detect a side collision, an accelerometer is positioned at the transition node from the B-pillar to the side sill on each side of the vehicle, and another in the lower area of the C-pillar.  This layout enables detection of collisions affecting the rear area of the vehicle as well.

Euro NCAP test results
The new Sharan has yet to be tested under Euro NCAP (European New Car Assessment Programme). 

Line-up and insurance groups
Thanks to its impressive security and safety features, the Sharan has secured the following insurance group ratings from the ABI (Association of British Insurers):

S  
1.4-litre TSI 150 PS 16E
2.0-litre TDI 140 PS 18E
   
SE  
1.4-litre TSI 150 PS  16E
2.0-litre TDI 140 PS  18E
2.0-l itre TDI 170 PS   21E
   
SEL  
2.0-litre TSI 200 PS DSG TBC
2.0-litre TDI 140 PS 18E
2.0-litre TDI 170 PS 21E
   
Executive  
2.0-litre TDI 140 PS 18E

In December 2009, the insurance industry switched from a 1-20 rating system to a 1-50 system.  New ratings are shown here.  The ‘E’ denotes that the vehicle exceeded the Thatcham (ABI) requirements.

WARRANTIES

The Sharan has a three year (first and second year manufacturer operated, third year retailer operated) mechanical warranty.  In addition, it comes with a class-leading 12 year anti-perforation guarantee, three year paint warranty and a year’s membership of Volkswagen Assistance.  The latter can be extended at minimal cost to the customer.

(ends)

NewSharan – KT/1010

Latest press kits

IMAGES

VIDEOS